Wenbin Lin Professor

Born Fujian, China, 1966.
University of Science and Technology of China (USTC), B.S., 1988.
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Ph.D., 1994.
Northwestern University, NSF Postdoctoral Fellow, 1994-1997.
Brandeis University, Assistant Professor, 1997-2001.
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,
Assistant Professor, 2001-2003
Associate Professor, 2003-2007
Professor, 2007-2013.
Kenan Distinguished Professor, 2011-2013
University of Chicago, James Franck Professor, 2013 –

Accolades

2012, Acting Chair, Physical Science Panel, Hong Kong Research Grant Council

2011, On the “top 100 chemists” list based on per article citations (Thompson Reuters)

2010, On the “top ten chemists” list based on per article citations (Thompson Reuters

2001, Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award

2000, Arnold and Mabel Beckman Young Investigator Award

2000, Research Corporation Cottrell Scholar Award

2000, Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship

1999, National Science Foundation CAREER Award

1994-1997, National Science Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship

1994, T.S. Piper Award for Graduate Research in Inorganic Chemistry, University of Illinois

1991-1993, University of Illinois Department of Chemistry Fellowship

1988, USTC Yi-li-da Award for Undergraduate Research

 

2000, Arnold and Mabel Beckman Young Investigator Award
2000, Research Corporation Cottrell Scholar Award
2000, Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship
1999, National Science Foundation CAREER Award
1994-1997, National Science Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship
1994, T.S. Piper Award for Graduate Research in Inorganic Chemistry, University of Illinois
1991-1993, University of Illinois Department of Chemistry Fellowship
1988, USTC Yi-li-da Award for Undergraduate Research

 

 

 

OFFICE: GCIS E519A

PHONE: (773) 834-7163

E-MAIL: wenbinlin@uchicago.edu

WEB: http://linlab.uchicago.edu/

RESEARCH INTERESTS:

Our group works on a variety of interdisciplinary research projects concerning sustainability and human health. Ongoing projects range from metal-organic frameworks, to catalysis, to renewable energy, and to Nanomedicine. While addressing fundamental chemical problems, our research efforts are highly relevant to important societal issues, such as the environment and sustainability (catalysis and actinide sequestration); alternative renewable energy (solar fuels and biofuels); and human health (nanomedicine and metallopharmaceuticals).

 

1. Metal-organic Frameworks

Our group pioneered the rational design of functional solids based on metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). We have designed a large number of MOFs and explored their applications in nonlinear optics, asymmetric catalysis, gas storage/separation, and solar energy utilization. Current efforts are particularly focused on using MOFs as single-site solid asymmetric catalysts, storage media for hydrogen and methane, and sensory materials; for gas separations and carbon dioxide capture; and for light-harvesting and photocatalysis.

 

2. Catalysis

Catalysis is a major research effort that cuts across many different research directions in our group. We are designing new highly enantioselective catalysts for a variety of organic transformations, and applying this expertise to solar and bio-energy generation. By taking advantage of our multidisciplinary expertise, we are not only discovering new homogeneous catalysts but also developing novel strategies for heterogenization of these relevant catalytic systems. To further improve these catalysts, we are interested in elucidating the mechanisms and fundamental issues concerning many of these interesting catalytic reactions.

 

3. Renewable Energy

Our research efforts in renewable energy target three different forms of alternative energy: solar, bio, and nuclear. We are currently exploring new concepts for achieving artificial photosynthesis by integrating different functional components into hierarchically ordered molecular solids. We have developed strong expertise in light harvesting, water oxidation, and proton reduction. Our biofuel research involves designing new catalytic systems for highly efficient conversion of cheap, non-food feedstocks to biofuels and for increasing the performance of biofuels. Finally, our contributions to nuclear energy focus on developing novel sorbents for efficient extraction of uranium from seawater. By extracting uranium from seawater, which contains 1000 times more uranium than all terrestrial ores, we can ensure the availability of affordable, carbon-neutral power for many generations to come.

 

4. Nanomedicine

We are developing hybrid nanomaterials (including nanoscale metal-organic frameworks, silicas, polysilsequioxanes, and degradable polymers) for biomedical imaging and drug delivery. We exploit the unique capability of nanoparticles to disproportionally accumulate in diseased tissues via the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect or active targeting. These nanoparticles combine the attractive features of both inorganic and organic materials, making them promising platforms for translation to clinical use. Ongoing research efforts include designing nanoscale multimodal imaging contrast agents (magnetic resonance, computed tomography, and optical imaging) for early diagnosis of cancers as well as targeted delivery of potent drugs for improved cancer therapy. Strong emphasis is placed on preclinical evaluations of these systems to enable their clinical translation.

 

 

Selected Publications

 

1. Nanoscale Metal-Organic Framework for Highly Effective Photodynamic Therapy of Resistant Head and Neck Cancer. Lu, K.; He, C.; Lin, W. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2014, 136, 16712-16715.

2. Manna, K.; Zhang, T.; Carboni, M.; Abney, C.W.; Lin, W. Salicylaldimine-based Metal-Organic Framework Enabling Highly Active Olefin Hydrogenation with Iron and Cobalt Catalysts. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2014, 136, 13182-13185.

3. He, C.; Lu, K.; Lin, W. Nanoscale Metal-organic Frameworks for Real-Time Intracellular pH Sensing in Live Cells. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2014, 136, 12253-12256.

4. Liu, D.; Poon, C.; Lu, K.; He, C.; Lin, W. Self-Assembled Nanoscale Coordination Polymers with Superb Biodistributions and Trigger Release Properties for Effective Anticancer Therapy. Nat. Commun. 2014, 5, 4182.

5. Wang, C.; Volotskova, O.; Lu, K.; Ahmad, M.; Sun, C.; Xing, L.; Lin, W. Synergistic Assembly of Heavy Metal Clusters and Luminescent Organic Bridging Ligands in Metal-organic Frameworks for Highly Efficient X-ray Scintillation. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2014, 136, 6171-6174.

6. Manna, K.; Zhang, T.; Lin, W. Post-synthetic Metalation of Bipyridyl-containing Metal-organic Frameworks for Highly Efficient Catalytic Organic Transformations. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2014, 136, 6566-6569.

7. Falkowski, J.M.; Sawano, T.; Zhang, T.; Tsun, G.; Chen, Y.; Lockard, J.V.; Lin, W. Privileged Phosphine-Based Metal-Organic Frameworks for Broad-Scope Asymmetric Catalysis. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2014, 136, 5213-5216.

8. Han, X.-B.; Zhang, Z.-M.; Li, Y.-G.; Lin, W.; You, W.-S.; Su, Z.-M.; Wang, E.-B. Polyoxometalate-Based Cobalt−Phosphate Molecular Catalysts for Visible Light-Driven Water Oxidation.” J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2014, 136, 5359-5366.

9. He, C.; Lu, K.; Lin, W. Nanoscale Metal-organic Frameworks for the Co-delivery of Cisplatin and Pooled siRNAs to Enhance Therapeutic Efficacy in Drug-resistant Ovarian Cancer Cells. J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2014, 136, 5181-5184.

10. Zhang, T.; Wang, C.; Liu, S.; Wang, J.-L.; Lin, W. A Biomimetic Copper Water Oxidation Catalyst with Low Overpotential. J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2014, 136, 273-281.